Agents can charge for joint tenancy changes - Maras
Agents will be permitted to charge a fee when a sharer of a joint tenancy changes, a Government minister has confirmed, providing the change is requested by the tenant.
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Agents can charge for joint tenancy changes

Agents will be permitted to charge a fee when a sharer of a joint tenancy changes, a Government minister has confirmed, providing the change is requested by the tenant.
Heather Wheeler, minister for housing and homelessness, confirmed to MPs on the CLG Committee that the Draft Tenants’ Fees Bill would be changed to clarify this, during a hearing in February.
She said: “We think that this is an area where further clarity is needed and we intend to permit a charge for a variance on the tenancy and charges related to a change of sharer where these are requested by the tenant.
“It would be appropriate to charge a fee for a change of tenancy for a sharer, when the tenant is asking for that.”
The Bill seeks to reduce costs to tenants by banning landlords and their agents from requiring any payments from tenants as a condition of granting, renewing or continuing a tenancy with the exception of rent, a refundable tenancy deposit, a refundable holding deposit and tenant default fees (for things like lost keys or late rent payments).
The Government has confirmed that the letting agent fee ban on tenants will not be in place before Spring 2019 at the earliest.
Politicians were urged to simplify the Draft Tenants’ Fees Bill to ensure it can be effectively enforced.
Bournemouth Borough councillor Robert Lawton said the current draft legislation was “open to abuse” with a complex range of fees that could still be charged to tenants.
He also told politicians that there needed to be “effective deterrents” in the form of higher financial penalties to ensure compliance.
The proposed new laws will mean tenants can only be asked to pay their rent and an up-front deposit.
The laws will cap holding deposits at no more than one week’s rent, and security deposits at no more than six weeks’ rent.
It will also lay out proposed requirements on landlords and agents to return a holding deposit to a tenant.
The Government’s plan to make it a civil offence to break the fee ban, with a fine of £5,000, has led to concerns that lettings agents could increase the fees they charged to landlords.
Concerns that the act would need to meet “criminal standards” for enforcement activity, and this could create problems for under-resourced local authorities, have also been raised.

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